Re-Grow Your Celery and Lettuce!

A couple months ago I posted about re-growing your green onions and it worked fantastically! In fact, a week or so after that post I planted them in soil and they’ve been doing great ever since! They’re still re-growing quickly after cutting.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe green onions worked out so well that I decided to expand into celery and lettuce! Oooooh! Ahhhhhhh!

Re-growing these veggies works basically the same way as the green onions. Cut all the stalks off from the bottom stump of celery (or romaine lettuce).

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPut the remaining celery nub into a little bowl lined with a paper towel and about a half inch of water. Then wait….

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA……and wait……

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA……and wait…..

……and about 3 weeks later, you should finally have a wee little celery plant starting.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAEven after this much time though, the roots have still just barely started to form. So I’m going to wait another couple weeks before I try planting this in soil.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnother vegetable that I’ve found this method works great for is romaine lettuce! And good news, it seems to take a lot less time than the celery. I’ve had this lettuce nub (prepared the same way as the celery nub) growing for about 1.5 weeks, half as much time as the celery. Yet it’s the same size! I think I see the very beginning of some roots forming, but I’ll definitely have to give it more time before I plant.

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The verdict so far on regrowing vegetables from food scraps? Green onions, totally worth it. Celery and Lettuce, mmmmmm probably not so much. But hey, it keeps me entertained while I’m unemployed, LOL!

UPDATE: The lettuce looked great up until about a week ago, at which point it suddenly shot up a huge stalk from the center with a few leaves coming off it. A quick search of the interwebs informed me that this is called “bolting” and seems to be caused by exposing the plant to cold temperatures early on (hmmm…..like beside an open window in San Francisco???) then when the weather heats up, the plant puts up one of these “bolts”. Unfortunately, the interwebs also informed me that when the lettuce bolts it becomes unsalvageably bitter. Bye, bye little lettuce, we hardly knew ye…..

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